C. Sommerville Quotes

Enjoy the best inspirational, motivational, positive, funny and famous quotes by C. Sommerville. Use words and picture quotations to push forward and inspire you keep going in life!

Image, Without a sense of the shame or guilt of his or her

Picture Quotes

Without a sense of the shame or guilt of his or her action, the child will only be hardened in rebellion by physical punishment. Shame (and praise) help the child to internalize the parent's judgment. It impresses upon the child that the parent is not only more powerful but also right. Like the Puritans, Locke (in 1690), wanted the child to adopt the parent's moral position, rather than simply bow to superior strength or social pressure.

C. Sommerville

Image, Ambivalence reaches the level of schizophrenia in our treatment of violence among

Picture Quotes

Ambivalence reaches the level of schizophrenia in our treatment of violence among the young. Parents do not encourage violence, but neither do they take up arms against the industries which encourage it. Parents hide their eyes from the books and comics, slasher films, videos and lyrics which form the texture of an adolescent culture. While all successful societies have inhibited instinct, ours encourages it. Or at least we profess ourselves powerless to interfere with it.

C. Sommerville

Image, In the years of the Roman Republic, before the Christian era, Roman

Picture Quotes

In the years of the Roman Republic, before the Christian era, Roman education was meant to produce those character traits that would make the ideal family man. Children were taught primarily to be good to their families. To revere gods, one's parents, and the laws of the state were the primary lessons for Roman boys. Cicero described the goal of their child rearing as "self- control, combined with dutiful affection to parents, and kindliness to kindred.

C. Sommerville

Image, If our entertainment culture seems debased and unsatisfying, the hope is that

Picture Quotes

If our entertainment culture seems debased and unsatisfying, the hope is that our children will create something of greater worth.But it is as if we expect them to create out of nothing, like God, for the encouragement of creativity is in the popular mind, opposed to instruction. There is little sense that creativity must grow out of tradition, even when it is critical of that tradition, and children are scarcely being given the materials on which their creativity could work

C. Sommerville