Lord Chesterfield Quotes

Enjoy the best inspirational, motivational, positive, funny and famous quotes by Lord Chesterfield. Use words and picture quotations to push forward and inspire you keep going in life!

Image, Vanity, or to call it by a gentler name, the desire of

Picture Quotes

Vanity, or to call it by a gentler name, the desire of admiration and applause, is, perhaps, the most universal principle of humanactions.... Where that desire is wanting, we are apt to be indifferent, listless, indolent, and inert.... I will own to you, under the secrecy of confession, that my vanity has very often made me take great pains to make many a woman in love with me, if I could, for whose person I would not have given a pinch of snuff.

Lord Chesterfield

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Image, I am not of the opinion generally entertained in this country [England],

Picture Quotes

I am not of the opinion generally entertained in this country [England], that man lives by Greek and Latin alone; that is, by knowing a great many words of two dead languages, which nobody living knows perfectly, and which are of no use in the common intercourse of life. Useful knowledge, in my opinion, consists of modern languages, history, and geography; some Latin may be thrown into the bargain, in compliance with custom, and for closet amusement.

Lord Chesterfield

Image, Women of fashion and character–I do not mean absolutely unblemished–are a necessary

Picture Quotes

Women of fashion and character--I do not mean absolutely unblemished--are a necessary ingredient in the composition of good company; the attention which they require, and which is always paid them by well-bred men, keeps up politeness, and gives a habit of good-breeding; whereas men, when they live together without the lenitive of women in company, are apt to grow careless, negligent, and rough among one another.

Lord Chesterfield

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Image, Without any extraordinary effort of genius, I have discovered that nature was

Picture Quotes

Without any extraordinary effort of genius, I have discovered that nature was the same three thousand years ago as at present; that men were but men then as well as now; that modes and customs vary often, but that human nature is always the same. And I can no more suppose, that men were better, braver, or wiser, fifteen hundred or three thousand years ago, than I can suppose that the animals or vegetables were better than they are now.

Lord Chesterfield